Nursing Frequently Asked Questions

 

What does it mean to be a nurse?

As a nurse, myself, I want to properly educate those who want to learn more about nursing. So, in keeping with being honest, being a nurse is NOT all fairy tales and butterflies, but being a nurse and what it means to be a nurse, makes everything worth it. Being a nurse is HARD. Often it means sacrificing your time, energy, and money, so others can get the help they often desperately need. However, not every person you try to help, wants your help. This is hard to deal with at times, knowing individuals and their family members may be going through some of the worse times in their lives. But, getting up every morning, changing lives, SAVING lives, and providing the community with a service, is the most fulfilling thing in life, it makes everything worth it. So if you desire to be a nurse, go for it full steam ahead, and be a proud nurse.

 

What are the types of jobs a nurse can have?

Nursing is a versatile occupation and career with over 100 specialties to go into. Just a small list of areas of jobs a nurse can have are: acute care nursing with specialties in cardiac, pulmonary, neurology, renal, endocrine, psychiatric, surgery, orthopedics, pediatrics, geriatrics, intensive care, critical care, long-term care, ambulatory care such as offices, clinics, rehabilitation, dialysis, flight nursing, military nursing, nurse educator, clinical nurse specialist, nurse practitioner, research, and even writing. But, there is so many more...

To use a quick 5-minute questionnaire to find out your nursing speciality, click here. 

 

How much do nurses/Nurse Practitioners
make a year?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics in 2016-2017, the median pay of a LPN is $44,090/yr, with the bottom 10% earning $32,050/yr and the top 10% earning $60,420/yr. 

The mean hourly wage of a LPN is $21.20/hr.

Source: U.S. BLS

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics in 2016-2017, the median pay of an RN is $68,450/yr, with the bottom 10% earning $47,120/yr and the top 10% earning $102,990/yr. 

The mean hourly wage of an RN is $32.70/hr.

Source: U.S. BLS

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the 2017 median pay of a nurse practitioner/CRNA/nurse midwife is $110,930, which is approximately $53.33 per hour

Source: U.S. BLS

How difficult is nursing school?

For the select few, nursing school may seem like any other class, however, for the VAST majority of nursing students, nursing school is one of the hardest things they've had to do in their life. Nursing school is life-changing, not only in the difficulty level, but the strain on friend, family, and personal relationships, but also mental strain. Nursing school also is life-changing in a way that opens the door to a new career, a new life, and a new way of thinking. Nursing school, often can "make or break" a student and, for most, should be not taken lightly. Once you are on the other side, graduated, and have job prospects, a whole new level of stress begins with passing the NCLEX examination. 

 

What is the NCLEX examination and what is required to take it?

The NCLEX examination is required to become a license nurse in the United States. There are two types of NCLEX examinations, the NCLEX-RN and the NCLEX-PN. 

NCLEX-PN is the entry level exam for the license practical nurse (LPN) and is required to practice nursing in the United States.

NCLEX-RN is the entry level exam for the registered nurse (RN) and is required to practice nursing in the United States at the registered nurse level. 

Requirements may very by state, but overall, in order to be eligible and sit for the NCLEX examination, one must have graduated from an accredited school of nursing, successfully completed the required number of observed clinical hours, passed a criminal background check, and paid all fees associated with the application and NCLEX exam.

The accreditation bodies for schools of nursing: the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA), and the American College of Nurse-Midwifery Division of Accreditation (ACNM).

To find more information about the NCLEX, please visit the website of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing.